Nose Treatment

Sinus Surgery

Sinus Surgery is one of the most common operations performed. Dr. Campano will review with you whether this procedure is the appropriate procedure to open possible sinus obstructions. Removal of such obstructions may require eliminating polyps that are blocking sinus openings or possibly enlarging the hole that sinuses drain through.

Sinuses are the empty pockets that are filled with air in the head. There are actually four pairs of sinuses within your skull. These circulate air while lubricating the nose. This keeps the sinuses free of bacteria, dirt, and other particles. Mucos line the sinuses and secrete mucus which traps particles from incoming air. These dust particles are then expelled via cilia, small hair like fibers. Sinuses that are in good health are not obstructed or clogged. Mucus is able to pass through into the nose and then the throat without problems.

Colds, allergies, infections or other obstructions of the sinuses (i.e. deviated septum) can cause inflammation of the mucosa and block the drainage of the sinus cavities. If the sinuses become inflamed, Sinusitis can occur. The mucos becomes thicker and cannot pass through the openings and end up accumulating in the sinuses. Many symptoms can arise including fever, headaches, and pain over and underneath the eyes. Polyps form when mucosa becomes swollen by repeated infections.

Dr. Campano will determine if you have sinusitis during your examination. She will examine your ear, nose and throat and determine the cause of your sinusitis. Diagnosis can occur with the help of x-rays, CAT scan or MRIs in order to see the sinuses within your skull. Blood or allergy tests may also be performed. Treatment may be based upon the cause of your infection. Obstructions caused by allergies can be minimize or eliminated by treating the allergy. Sometimes humidifiers, warm compress over your sinuses, or drinking lots of fluids (which thins out your mucus) can also alleviate symptoms. Medications including antibiotics can treat an infection in the sinuses and control the condition. Repeated sinusitis may be caused by an obstruction and will be most responsive to surgery.

Surgery can be performed in a number of ways. It???s possible that the walls between sinuses are removed to make the sinuses larger. When the sinuses are larger, there is less of chance for obstruction to occur. Sometimes new openings are created in the sinuses for better drainage. If an obstruction is caused by a deviated septum, surgery can help straighten it out. Many of these options are performed endoscopically and under general anesthesia. Patients usually are treated and go home the same day.

Sinus surgery is a very common procedure and helps treat sinus disorders. There are some rare risks, which should be discussed during your visit with Dr. Campano. She will explain possible complications to help you better understand your treatment options.

Septoplasty/Turbinoplasty

A deviated septum is one of the most common reasons to have non-cosmetic nasal surgery. Your septum can be crooked and may result in a smaller nasal passage on one side or the other, or even both. In a normal nose, the mucosal lining swells and retract many times a day. With a deviated septum, one may have difficulty breathing from either side of the nose. It is usually from the already small passageway being blocked further from the swollen mucosal lining. Sometimes, blockage can occur when there is additional cartilage, bone or mucosal tissue.

This difficulty in breathing through the nose could be corrected through a Septoplasty. Many people breathe loudly and others think their noses are stuffed, but in fact they suffer from a deviated septum and when their tissues naturally swell, the side with the deviation is even more restricted.

A Septoplasty is the surgical procedure to straighten a deviated or crooked septum to improve breathing, function, and minimize possible sinus infections, creating greater comfort for the patient. A septoplasty is almost always performed with no visible incision and normally takes about 1 to 1 1/2 hours. If the Septoplasty is being performed in conjunction with a Rhinoplasty, there may be additional, visible incisions and may take about an additional hour or more for difficult cases.

A Deviated Septum is by far the most common reason for non-cosmetic nasal surgery. Your Septum can be crooked and result in a smaller nasal passage on one side or the other, or even both sides! The mucosal lining of the nasal passages normally swell and retract several times during the day. If someone with severe or a minor deviated septum experiences difficulty breathing, it is usually from the already small passageway being blocked further from the swollen mucosal lining. Its amazing that many people who go through their entire lives may never know that their difficulty breathing through the nose could be corrected through a Septoplasty!

If you have concerns regarding nasal breathing or repetitive sinus infections, please contact Dr. Campano. As an ENT, she can properly examine and diagnose you for the possible need of a Septoplasty or other surgery, perhaps in the form of sinus correction.

After Septorhinoplasty

After your surgery

After surgery-particularly during the first twenty-four hours-your face will feel puffy, your nose may ache, and you may have a dull headache. You can control any discomfort with the pain medication prescribed by Dr. Campano. Plan on staying in bed with your head elevated (except for going to the bathroom) for the first dayYou’ll notice that the swelling and bruising around your eyes will increase at first, reaching a peak after two or three days. Applying cold compresses will reduce this swelling and make you feel a bit better. We use a cool gel mask to gently cool the tissues. In any case, you’ll feel a lot better than you look. Most of the swelling and bruising should disappear within two weeks or so.

A little drainage is common during the first few days following surgery, and you may continue to feel some stuffiness for several weeks. Dr. Campano will probably ask you not to blow your nose for a week or so, while the tissues heal.

Dr. Campano uses techniques to minimize packing and most of her patients do not need nasal packing. If you have nasal packing, it will be removed after a few days and you’ll feel much more comfortable. By the end of one or, occasionally, two weeks, all dressings, splints, and stitches should be removed.

Getting back to normal

Most rhinoplasty patients are up and about within two days, and able to return to school or sedentary work a few days to a week or so following surgery. It will be several weeks, however, before you’re entirely up to speed.

Dr. Campano will give you more specific guidelines for gradually resuming your normal activities. They’re likely to include these suggestions: Avoid strenuous activity (jogging, swimming, bending, sexual relations-any activity that increases your blood pressure) for two to three weeks. Avoid hitting or rubbing your nose, or getting it sunburned, for eight weeks. Be gentle when washing your face and hair or using cosmetics.

You can wear contact lenses as soon as you feel like it, but glasses are another story. Once the splint is off, they’ll have to be taped to your forehead or propped on your cheeks for another six to seven weeks, until your nose is completely healed.

Dr. Campano will schedule frequent follow-up visits in the months after surgery, to check on the progress of your healing. If you have any unusual symptoms between visits, or any questions about what you can and can’t do, don’t hesitate to.

After Sinus Surgery

The following information applies when upper jaw bone height or width have been lost. The graft is placed to help restore your jawbone in preparation for possible implant replacement of the missing tooth or teeth.You have had a Sinus Lift Augmentation procedure in your upper jaw. This procedure regains lost bone height in the area of your first and second molar and occasionally second premolar. It is an important procedure as it allows implant placement in an area that could not be implanted otherwise because of insufficient bone height due to an enlarged sinus.

The bone that has been grafted is most commonly a combination freeze-dried bone, artificial synthetic bone and your own bone. Because of this you may have two post-surgical wounds: the donor site and the recipient site.DO NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES. BLOW YOUR NOSE FOR THE NEXT FOUR (4) WEEKS. This may be longer if indicated. You may sniff all you like but NO BLOWING.

Do not blow your nose or sneeze holding your nose. Sneeze with your mouth open. Do not drink with straws and do not spit. Scuba diving and flying in pressurized aircraft may also increase sinus pressure and should be avoided. Decongestants such as Drixoral, Dimetapp, or Sudafed will help reduce pressure in the sinuses. You may also be given a prescription for antibiotics. Please take these as directed. Anything that causes pressure in your nasal cavity must be avoided. Avoid “bearing down” ??? as when lifting heavy objects, blowing up balloons, playing musical instruments that require a blowing action or any other activity that increases nasal or oral pressure. Smoking must be stopped. If necessary Dr. Campano can prescribe Nicoderm patches.

Antibiotics

Be sure to take the prescribed antibiotics as directed to help prevent infection.